Lectures – Forthcoming

WEDNESDAY 18th MAY 2016

PROFESSOR MARTIN GOODMAN

(Oxford University and Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies)

AGRIPPA II: THE LAST JEWISH KING IN JERUSALEM

6.00 pm King’s College, Safra Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor, King’s Building, Strand,

London WC2R 2LS. Followed by refreshments

The Jewish king Agrippa II, the great-grandson of Herod the Great, played a pivotal role in the politics of Jerusalem during the decades leading up to the outbreak of war against Rome in 66 CE. During the war itself, he fought against the Jewish rebels alongside the Roman forces commanded by Titus, who in 70 CE presided over the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple and in 79 CE became Roman emperor. The lecture will examine evidence for Agrippa’s career in the archaeological and numismatic record as well as in contemporary literature, and the impact on his later reputation of his ambiguous status in Rome during the seventies CE, when his sister Berenice was known as Titus’ lover.

Martin Goodman is Professor of Jewish Studies in the University of Oxford, where he is a Fellow of Wolfson College and President of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. He has written many books on Jewish and Roman history, including Rome and Jerusalem (2007).

(Organised jointly with King’s College, London)


MONDAY 27th JUNE 2016 (AGM Lecture)

DR SAM MOORHEAD

(British Museum)

EVER DECREASING CIRCLES – CAESAREA MARITIMA AS AN EPICENTRE OF THE LATE ROMAN “NUMMUS ECONOMY”

6.00 pm Lecture Theatre G6, Ground Floor, Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY. Followed by refreshments

(The lecture will be preceded by the AGM, which will commence at 5.00 pm)

nummus of Honorius (AD 393-423), ©British Museum
nummus of Honorius (AD 393-423), ©British Museum

In 1982, Sam Moorhead was tasked with cataloguing over 2000 coins found on the beaches of Caesarea Maritima.  This led to a lifelong interest in late Roman and early Byzantine bronze coins, called nummi.  This lecture will show how Caesarea was a key nodal point in a Mediterranean wide ‘nummus economy’ that lasted for well over a century.

Dr Sam Moorhead is the National Finds Adviser for Iron Age and Roman coins with the Portable Antiquities Scheme at the British Museum.  He has worked as an archaeologist and numismatist on sites across Britain and the Mediterranean, including in Israel. He has been Chairman of the Palestine Exploration Fund, served on the Council of the Anglo-Israel Archaeological Society for many years, and has been Honorary Secretary of the Roman Society.

(Organised jointly with the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London)

The Society’s AGM will take place at 5.00pm preceding the lecture in Lecture Theatre G6