Lectures – Forthcoming

MONDAY 21st JANUARY 2019
PROF. SARAH PEARCE  
(University of Southampton)
FRESH LIGHT ON CLEOPATRA

7:30 PM – Sephardi Synagogue, 24 Wicker Lane, Hale Barns
Cheshire  WA15 0HQ

Organised in collaboration with the Centre for Jewish Studies,
The University of Manchester and The Jewish Historical Society of England

From Josephus we have one of the most damning of all ancient portraits of Cleopatra VII (69-30 BCE), highlighting her alleged malevolence towards Jews in her kingdom and towards her neighbour, Herod the Great. In this talk, Sarah Pearce will explore the ancient portraits, inscriptions and literature that shed light on Cleopatra’s relations with the Jews.

Sarah Pearce is Ian Karten Professor of Jewish Studies at the University of Southampton. She is the author of The Land of the Body: Studies in Philo’s Representation of Egypt (2007) and of other studies on the history and culture of Jews in the Graeco-Roman world.

Priority will be given to bookings made through Eventbrite.
Please click this link to reserve a seat.


MONDAY 18th FEBRUARY 2019
PROF. JOHN HEALEY
(University of Manchester)
ARAMAIC AND THE NATIVE VOICE: 300 BCE to CE

6:00 PM – Institute of Archaeology, University College London,
Lecture Theatre G6 (Ground Floor), 31-34 Gordon Square,
London WC1H OPY

Organised jointly with the Institute of Archaeology, UCL

One of the Nabataean tombs at Mada’in Salih in Saudi Arabia – photo courtesy of John Healey

The lecture will begin with a brief history of Aramaic in its earliest known phases, emphasizing its role as an international language under the Achaemenid Persians and describing its continued use in the Greek and Roman Near East. The main theme will be the way that Aramaic epigraphy gives us access to the “native voice” and the ordinary lives of the pagans, Jews and Christians, in places like Judaea, Nabataea and Edessa. The voice of the natives is not usually heard: the Greeks and Romans did all the talking, leaving behind inscriptions and literary works in which they presented their own view of the natives, the view of outsiders. The Aramaic inscriptions allow us to hear about everyday lives, legal transactions and religious sentiments.

John Healey retired in 2013 from the post of Professor of Semitic Studies in the University of Manchester. Since about 1985, his research and publications have been concentrated in the fields of Nabataean and early Syriac epigraphy, leading to books on The Nabataean Tomb Inscriptions of Mada’in Salih (1993), The Religion of the Nabataeans (2001) and Aramaic Inscriptions and Documents of the Roman Period (2009). He is currently working on early Syriac legal documents and on Nabataean Aramaic grammar. John is a Fellow of the British Academy.


THURSDAY 7th MARCH 2019
PROF. MARTIN BIDDLE
(University of Oxford)
THE TOMB OF CHRIST IN THE CHURCH OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE:
PROBLEMS OF RESTORATION & INVESTIGATION IN 2016
4.00pm BP Lecture Theatre, Clore Education Centre, British Museum

Organised jointly with the Palestine Exploration Fund

Book your free ticket through the British Museum’s box office
T: +44 (0)20 7323 8181 or online at www.britishmuseum.org