Lectures – Forthcoming

MONDAY 5th JUNE 2017

PROFESSOR AYELET GILBOA

(University of Haifa)

THE EMERGENCE OF ANCIENT ISRAEL AND ITS NEIGHBOURS: ARCHAEOLOGY, HISTORY AND BIBLE

6.00pm – Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Theatre G6, Ground Floor, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY

Tel Dor
The Phoenician Site of Tel Dor and the 11th century BCE Wenamun Papyrus (Image courtesy of Ayelet Gilboa)

Around 1200 BCE all economic/political structures in the Ancient Near East dramatically collapsed and in the following so called ‘dark age’ several new identities were forged. We will follow these transformations in the Levant, especially the emergence of ancient Israel and its relation to the birth of the Kingdoms of Israel and Judah. Beyond Israel, the consolidation of its neighbours – the Philistines and Phoenicians – since, as usual, neighbouring identities rise in contradistinction to each other.

Professor Ayelet Gilboa is former Chair of the Department of Archaeology at the University of Haifa, where she teaches various courses related to the Archaeology of the Near East in the Bronze and Iron Ages, and archaeological theory and practice. She specializes in Coastal archaeology, Phoenicians, Sea People, and Mediterranean interconnections. She co-directs the Tel Dor Excavations and directs the Tel Shikmona Publication Project –  both sites situated on Israel’s Carmel coast.

Organised jointly with the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College, London

followed by refreshments


MONDAY 26th JUNE 2017 (AGM Lecture)

PROFESSOR JAMES AITKEN

(University of Cambridge)

LIGHT ON THE JEWS OF PTOLEMAIC EGYPT

6.00pm–Institute of Archaeology, Lecture Theatre G6, Ground Floor, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY

The Society’s AGM commences at 5.00pm preceding the lecture

Mosaic
Mosaic depiction of Hellenistic Egypt-Image: Courtesy of James Aitken

The Ptolemaic era in Egypt (third to first centuries BCE) was a prosperous time for Jews judging by the literary productivity that can be assigned there. Yet, we know little about the Jewish community in this important period. The slim information we have from inscriptions and papyri has now been supplemented by major finds. Placing the new finds in context, the lecture will show how we might construct a renewed appreciation of the place of Jews in Egyptian society.

James Aitken is Reader in Hebrew and Early Jewish Studies at the Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge. His research focuses on Second Temple Judaism, including the use of Hebrew and Greek among Jews. He is currently investigating the origins of the Greek Bible translation in third century BCE Egypt and its place within Egyptian society. Publications include The Semantics of Blessing and Cursing in Ancient Hebrew (2007), No Stone Unturned: Greek Inscriptions and Septuagint Vocabulary (2014) and the T&T Clark Companion to the Septuagint (2015).

Organised jointly with Institute of Archaeology, London

followed by refreshments