Lectures – Forthcoming

THURSDAY 8th MARCH 2018
PROFESSOR JOAN TAYLOR
(King’s College, London)
FINDING QUMRAN CAVE 1Q ARTEFACTS
4.00pm – BP Lecture Theatre, Clore Education Centre,
The British Museum, Great Russell St, Bloomsbury,
London WC1B 3DG.

 The Allegro Jar from Qumran –courtesy of Joan Taylor
The Allegro Jar from Qumran –courtesy of Joan Taylor

This presentation will review the aims and achievements of the International Network for the Study of Dispersed Qumran Cave Artefacts and Archival Sources. The work thus far has concentrated on materials connected with Qumran Cave 1Q, 3Q and 11Q. There has been a particular focus on the Cave 1Q jars dispersed around the globe in various museums and collections. Cave 11Q linen has been radiocarbon dated with interesting results. The digitisation of the Allegro archive has included a rare film of the opening of the Copper Scroll. This is an ongoing research project of King’s College London, the University of Malta and the Faculty of Theology, Lugano University, funded by the Leverhulme Trust.

Joan E. Taylor is Professor of Christian Origins and Second Temple Judaism at King’s College London. A former recipient of an Irene Levi-Sala literary award for a study of the archaeology of Israel, she has wide-ranging interests, with a principal focus on Israel-Palestine in the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.

Organised jointly with the Palestine Exploration Fund.
*Please ensure you book your ticket for this lecture by telephone at the British Museum Box office on:
+44 (0)20 7323 8181 or online at www.britishmuseum.org and note the earlier start time than usual.


MONDAY 16th APRIL 2018
PROFESSOR CLAUDINE DAUPHIN
LOST BEYOND THE RIVER:
WHERE WERE THE JEWS OF LATE ANTIQUE TRANSJORDAN?

 6:00 PM – Institute of Archaeology, University College London, Lecture Theatre G6 (Ground Floor),
31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H OPY

Drawing by C. Dauphin of carved menorah in reuse in Byzantine church excavated in 2016
by Abila Archaeological Project, John Brown University

According to Rabbinic literature, the lands East of the River Jordan – Biblical Ammon, Moab and Edom – lay within the boundaries of the ‘‘Land of Israel”. Archaeologically however, there is a mysterious blank for late antique Jewish communities in the region, particularly in Southern Jordan. The lecturer puts forward a tantalizing hypothesis, bridging the ‘‘gap’’ between textual sources and archaeological reality. She uses Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Landscape Archaeology, drawing on her own project on ‘‘Fallahin and Nomads’’ (affiliated to the Council for British Research in the Levant).

Claudine Dauphin is Honorary Professor in Archaeology and Theology at the University of Trinity St David’s, Lampeter. Since 1975, she has directed Byzantine excavations for the Israel Antiquities Authority and she has applied British methods of Landscape Archaeology to the Golan in Late Antiquity.

This lecture will be held in memory of Professor Yoram Tsafrir

refreshments will be served after the lecture

Organised jointly with The Institute of Archaeology,
University College, London


THURSDAY 3rd MAY 2018 and THURSDAY 10th MAY 2018
PROFESSOR JODI MAGNESS
(University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
SAMSON IN STONE: NEW DISCOVERIES IN THE ANCIENT SYNAGOGUE AT HUQOQ IN ISRAEL’S GALILEE

6.00 PM – THURSDAY 3rd MAY 2018
King’s College London, Lecture Theatre 2, Bush House,
30 Aldwych, London WC2B 4BG

and

7.30PM – THURSDAY 10th MAY 2018
South Manchester Synagogue, The Firs, Bowdon,
Cheshire WA14 2TE

Image from the Huqoq mosaic - courtesy of Jodi Magness
Image from the Huqoq mosaic – courtesy of Jodi Magness

Since 2011, Professor Jodi Magness has been directing excavations in the ancient village of Huqoq in Israel’s Galilee.  These have brought to light the remains of a monumental Late Roman (fifth century) synagogue building paved with stunning and unique mosaics, including biblical scenes and the first non-biblical story ever discovered decorating an ancient synagogue.  In this slide-illustrated lecture, Professor Magness describes these exciting finds, including the discoveries made in last summer’s season. For more information visit www.huqoq.org

Jodi Magness is the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is the author of numerous books and articles on the archaeology of ancient Palestine, including on Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient Jerusalem, Masada and the Roman army in the East, ancient pottery, and ancient synagogues.

Priority will be given to bookings made through Eventbrite
to reserve a seat for both lectures.
Please reserve your seat for the London lecture here.
For the Manchester lecture, please reserve your seat here. 

The London venue is in collaboration with the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College London, followed by refreshments